Reply to de Marchi: Modeling Polarization of Political Attitudes

Abstract

In “The complexity of polarization” (PNAS 2022), de Marchi offers several critiques of our Attraction-Repulsion Model of political polariztation: the results repeat conventional wisdom, are difficult to reconcile with the current US political climate, focus on ideological instead of affective polarization, and are difficult to falsify. This response addresses these four criticisms and reemphasizes several surprising results.

Publication
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Robert Axelrod
Robert Axelrod
Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Public Policy
Stephanie Forrest
Stephanie Forrest
Professor of Computer Science
Joshua J. Daymude
Joshua J. Daymude
Assistant Professor, Computer Science

I am a Christian and assistant professor in computer science studying collective emergent behavior and programmable matter through the lens of distributed computing, stochastic processes, and bio-inspired algorithms. I also love gaming and playing music.

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